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BAJR Update: The More Than Minima Campaign

21 May

The British Archaeology Jobs and Resource (BAJR) site has recently unleashed a new campaign aimed at highlighting job adverts that pay more than the minimum salary wage.  The More than Minima campaign aims to highlight and recognise any job advertisement on the BAJR website that pays beyond the minima as a starting rate, which helps to promote fair pay within the archaeological industry.  Advertisements that meet this criteria will have the BAJR grene thumbs up logo attached to the job advertisements, so that potential applicants can immediately know that the company and position pay above the recognised and current pay grades.

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On all archaeological job advertisements on the BAJR website look out for the green thumbs up logo to show that the advertisement offers a More than Minima salary (Image courtesy of David Connolly/BAJR).

I had the chance to ask David Connolly, who runs the BAJR site and has kickstarted the campaign himself, why he felt it was necessary to bring in the More than Minima campaign now and what he hoped to achieve with it.  This is his response:

I think the point is the positivity of the campaign.  This is not a punishment driven proposal, it is one that commends the companies that try that little bit extra to provide better pay (and conditions) for their staff.  Flagging these adverts is a way of saying thanks! It also hopefully suggests that paying better than the bare minima is a way to attract staff, who will be more inclined to feel valued.

Of course the campaign will continue along with the skills passport (which is to be ready in 1 week).  The real battle is in getting the archaeologists to support it as well. Not to take below minima jobs, not to accept poor pay and not to continue the fallacy that any job is better than none.

This is a big directional campaign rewarding companies and asking archaeologists to help it grow.

The new campaign follows hot on the trail of the announcement this week that the rising levels of interest rates and inflation rates threaten the recovery of the UK economy.  Whilst it is hoped that the rise in wages will outpace inflation in the long term, it is news that will worry many.  Archaeology is a profession that has long been undervalued, both in terms of actual inherent worth and in the many diverse skills that the sector and it’s employees actually have.

Here at These Bones of Mine I heartily endorse the new campaign and hope that you to can join in and spread the word about it as well.  We must not, as archaeologists, undersell or undervalue our skilled industry.  As such I believe that this campaign will benefit not just the job seeking archaeologist and the companies themselves, but archaeology as an industry by setting an industry standard.   The recent approval and success  for the Chartership of the Institute of Archaeologists has come at a great time for the archaeology industry, but we must continue to promote the value and wealth of the archaeology profession as a whole.  The More than Minima is one more such campaign and I urge you to back it.

Further Info

  • See the BAJR forum for the announcement of the More Than Minima campaign and for some reaction from the archaeological community.

A Stone to Throw II: Upcoming Archaeology Conferences

7 Apr

A few dates for the diary as this year sees some pretty exciting archaeology and bioarchaeology themed conferences rolling towards us in the next four months of 2014 or so.  Conferences are fantastic places to learn about new techniques or research approaches in archaeology.  It can also be a thrill watching famed archaeologists and professors speak in the flesh about topics which they are passionate about.  Conferences, depending on their target audience, can sometimes be open to the public and members of academia alike, but they can also vary widely in cost depending on their location, size and prestige.

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Without further ado here are a few conferences that have peaked my interest and some that I hope to attend myself (although Istanbul may have to be missed due to an unfortunate clash with BABAO):

Dearne Valley Archaeology Day 2014, Wath-Upon-Dearne

The community focused Elmet Archaeology group, who were recently mentioned here as a part of an interview with their osteoarchaeologist Lauren McIntyre, are hosting their annual Dearne Valley Archaeology Day in Wath-Upon-Dearne, South Yorkshire, on Saturday the 31st of May.  Open to the members of the public and archaeologists alike, the day long conference costs £18 (£14 unwaged) to attend and boasts a host of speakers on a variety of topics.  The full list of speakers has yet to be announced but so far includes British archaeological stalwarts such as David Connolly of BAJR fame, Prof Joan Fletcher of the University of York and a range of speakers from archaeological units across the country.  There will also be a number of stalls on the day, including information booths on how to illustrate archaeology style by Kate Adelade, Dearne Valley Archaeology Group and a stall with Jenny Crangle detailing the medieval Rothwell Charnel Chapel Project (which has been previously discussed on this blog).   

Exploring Changing Human Beliefs About Death, Mortality and the Human Body, Invisible Dead Project Conference, Durham

The University of Durham is playing host to the Invisible Dead Project conference from Friday 6th of to the Sunday the 8th of June.  The conference has two lectures on the Friday and Saturday nights which are open to the public and two full days of talks for students and academics during the Saturday and Sunday daytime.  The conference is, quite wonderfully, completely free to attend.  The ongoing Invisible Dead Project is a large-scale international collaboration aimed at studying the prehistoric and historic attitudes to death and burial of Britain and the Levant areas.  Information and details of sites under study can be found here at the University of Durham webpage.

The conference welcomes anthropologists, archaeologists and members of the public interested in death and  human remains in prehistory and up contemporary society to attend.  The first public speaker is Prof. Peter Pfälzner, from the University of Tübingen, explaining work carried out on long-term royal funerary processes at Qatna, Syria, on Friday night (6.30pm), whilst Prof Mike Parker Pearson discusses problems and perspectives in funerary archaeology on the Saturday night (6.30pm).  If you are interested in attending the conference forms should be completed before the 30th of April.

British association of Biological Anthropologists and Osteoarchaeologists, Durham

The British Association of Biological Anthropology and Osteoarchaeology are holding their annual conference at the University of Durham in September, from Friday 12th to the Sunday 14th.  The three-day conference will feature a broad range of presentations, talks and posters on the great range and wealth of  osteoarchaeology in Britain and beyond.  The call for papers has just been announced and is open until the 9th of June.  Last year’s conference program can be found here.  Although details have not been released just yet of the costs of attending the conference, it is likely that it will upwards of £140 to attend (based on 2013 BABAO member rates).  The information concerning the 4 sessions has just been released and are based around the following clusters:

1) The body and society: past perspectives on the present

2) Biological anthropology and infectious disease: new developments in understanding from bioarchaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology, and archaeozoology

3) New developments in biomolecular methods

4) Open session

Details on the key-note speakers for each session can be found here, as can further information on conference guidelines for following abstract guidelines and submission dates.  The BABAO conference is the foundation stone of conferences in the UK osteology calendar as it really does represent the best in current research in the UK and beyond.  Although I have yet to attend one (due to costs), I have high hopes of attending this year’s event in the lovely historic (and local to me) city of Durham.

European Association of Archaeologists, Istanbul

The European Association for Archaeologists host their conference in September, from the Wednesday the 10th to the Sunday the 14th, in Istanbul, Turkey.  The call for papers and posters has now closed, but they did receive a very healthy 2400 submissions in total.  The broad topics of discussion for the 2014 session are categorised into 6 different focus areas including:

1) Connecting seas: across the borders

2) Managing archaeological heritage: past and present

3) Ancient technologies in social context

4) Environment and subsistence: the geosphere, ecosphere and human interaction

5) Times of change: collapse and transformative impulses

6) Retrieving and interpreting the archaeology record

The fees for attending the EAA conference ranges in price from €40 to €180 dependent on category of the applicant (see here for the full extensive list, you are enrolled as a member of the EAA on purchase of conference tickets), but all are welcome to join the conference.  It promises to be an interesting conference with the attendance of some of the most important archaeologists in Europe discussing a wide variety of topics, including a number of speakers discussing human osteology related topics.  Istanbul is also a fantastic place to host a conference positioned as it is between the crossing of the West into the East and vice versa, and boasting a city full of heritage, archaeology and art.

Is Gender Still Relevant? University of Bradford

The British Academy and the University of Bradford are holding a two day event on the question of whether gender is still relevant.  The mini conference runs from Wednesday the 17th to the Thursday the 18th of September and it is free to attend.  Guest speakers include Professor Rosemary Joyce from the University of California and Dr Roberta Gilchrist from the University of Reading, who will discussing sex and gender dichotomies in archaeology.  You can find out more information here and, as far as I am aware, there is still time to submit abstracts for the conference.

No doubt there will be more archaeology and osteology based conferences going on so please feel free to leave a comment below.

Guest Post: The Rise of BAJR Part II by David Connolly

20 Mar

David Connolly is the founder of the British Archaeological Jobs and Resources (BAJR) website and runs, along with archaeologist Maggie Struckmeier, the Past Horizons website, a web portal specialising in the reporting of archaeological news and projects from around the globe.  Formerly a guitarist and key member of punk band Oi Polloi, David left to pursue a career in archaeology and subsequently worked the British field circuit for a number of years.  He has also excavated and surveyed sites in far-flung places such as Croatia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates and Jordan.  His experiences at York helped him form a keystone in his belief of the use of methodologies in archaeological practice.  Currently residing in Scotland, David specialises in archaeological surveys and regularly partakes in community archaeology projects.

Part 1 in this series, detailing David’s background and the inception of BAJR, can be found here.

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BAJR II

BAJR was founded on the same campaigning and irreverent principles as that of the Digger newsletter, but with added radical bite.

Alongside advertising job opportunities, it was also an important part of that founding principal that BAJR stood up for field archaeologists whose conditions of employment were at that point pretty dire, with most wages just above the poverty line. This sometimes meant that BAJR had to face an aggressive attitude from various companies, as they tended to perceive they were being forced to change against their will by a somewhat dictatorial individual.

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The modern face of BAJR, the first port of call and main site for job advertisements, news and course for archaeologists.

BAJR was and still is prepared to put ethics over income and therefore refuses to accept job adverts that pay below the 9 minima grades. This was set up around 10 years ago to try to institute a fairer system that recognised skills over job titles.

Along with the issue of pay and conditions, BAJR is willing to phone up any company and negotiate a way forward, and to discuss perceived or real issues. BAJR often intervenes informally on behalf of an individual or group in an effort to resolve a situation.

Information Station

BAJR is also an important source of accurate information directories that can be accessed by all. Currently there are details of circa 650 archaeological contractors across Europe, with full contact details, allowing the possibility for anyone to get in touch with a company without having to search through individual websites.

The same is true of the lists of active archaeology societies, Portable Antiquities services, re-enactment groups and archaeological curators. Universities, courses and training are all integrated into a fully searchable or accessible resource.

It is true to say that information is power, and BAJR is always driving to keep that information up to date and as accurate as possible for the benefit of everyone.

Co-operation Ahead

There are many rumours and half-truths about the relationship between BAJR and the IfA, and it is fair to say that we have had our differences in the past. However, we are now developing a more positive attitude towards one another and this new-found spirit of co-operation may enable some very positive future benefits for the industry as a whole, so watch this space.

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As well as jobs BAJR offers links and information on university courses and short courses on a fantastic scale, helping you find the courses that you want to do.

One thing for sure is that BAJR is not going anywhere and will always be there for anyone who needs advice on any level along with access to good quality information.

The forum has been strengthened with a Facebook and Twitter presence, so discussion has become even more interesting and far-reaching. What is black and white and read all over? Why BAJR of course…

Read the final entry in this series at Part III here, which details the growth of BAJR and the new Archaeology Skills Passport…

Guest Post: The Rise of BAJR Part I by David Connolly

12 Dec

David Connolly is the founder of the British Archaeological Jobs and Resources (BAJR) website and runs, along with archaeologist Maggie Struckmeier, the Past Horizons website, a web portal specialising in the reporting of archaeological news and projects from around the globe.  Formerly a guitarist and key member of punk band Oi Polloi, David left to pursue a career in archaeology and subsequently worked the British field circuit for a number of years.  He has also excavated and surveyed sites in far flung places such as Croatia, Turkmenistan, United Arab Emirates and Jordan.  His experiences at York helped him form a keystone in his belief of the use of methodologies in archaeological practice.  Currently residing in Scotland, David specialises in archaeological surveys and regularly partakes in community archaeology projects.

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Once there was a time without BAJR (pronounced badger) – however, very little is understood about how it became a part of British archaeology and how it has evolved into its present day form.

The Man Behind BAJR

BAJR was a creation of myself, David Connolly and was born out of a realization that although the world of archaeology can be a wonderful place to be, it can equally create very real problems for those who wish to pursue it as a career.

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A long haired David Connolly and a trusted total station taking recordings and measurements during archaeological survey work.  Survey work is a key part of archaeological field research and plays a major role in the evaluation of archaeological sites and during excavations themselves.

At the end of the 1990s I was experiencing this very problem and was not in the best of places, both mentally and physically. Once in the not too distant past, the world was my oyster; I worked my way around the Middle East and Central Asia in winter and the UK circuit during the summer. But these halcyon days were not to last and I became trapped in an ever decreasing spiral of work dependence, an all too common malaise of the peripatetic jobbing archaeologist.

Around 1997 my life started to change for the better when I met Maggie my wife. She seemed to see saw some sort of potential in this washed up train wreck of a man.

I tried to ‘man up’ and made an effort to create a website to promote my own work, but it all felt a bit pointless.

At around the same time, I became aware of a newsletter called the Digger which was a ‘tell it like it is, no holds barred’ publication, doing the rounds of the site hut. Reading this suddenly made me very aware that I wasn’t the only one out there experiencing difficulties. This led to many discussions about all the associated employment problems such as poor wages and unregulated conditions that archaeologists were trying to cope with. Maggie then suggested that I do something positive with this knowledge and take a stand.

At last, I felt I had a real purpose and my sad little website got a makeover in August 1998 and became a platform to announce employment opportunities within the profession.

BAJR Beginnings

With this new belief that we can all do something positive to change our lives and not just sit and grumble about it became the foundation stone of BAJR. It was envisaged as a resource for collecting any archaeological jobs that were on the grapevine and also to act as a means to stay in touch and communicate.

Early BAJR existed in a time before social media and mobile internet. Connection was via dialup modems and field archaeologists would normally use the computer at their local library to check BAJR for jobs and then print any out to share around. Seeing the valuable role that BAJR was now playing in the employment process, archaeology companies were increasingly emailing job adverts for inclusion onto the website. BAJR was fast becoming a popular method of finding staff, not just for digging teams, but for other roles as well.

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An early version of the BAJR website.

This central portal ensured that postal lists were now becoming obsolete and the expense to a company of taking out a Guardian advert or similar was no longer required. Every BAJR job advert could be printed out and posted up on the walls of site huts in a matter of minutes after they were uploaded.

Each advert that came in was hand transcribed from email or letter over to an html page – but this scrutiny led to interesting consequences. Examining each and every job posting provided the opportunity to question and even to refuse those that seemed to pay less than the ‘standard’ wages. Of course, this meant that criteria needed to be made clearer so that companies and applicants knew what was acceptable and what was not.

A system needed to be formalised, something that provided markers for progression and pay minima grades based on responsibility. This was worked upon and then introduced, over two years and several discussions with contractors later, the nuances and present structure finally evolved.

Formalising

Simple to understand, it was generally accepted by most of the UK archaeological contractors as a basis for pay and conditions. It has to be stressed though that these grades have never sought to replace Institute for Archaeologists levels (PIfA, IAfA and MIfA) or even attempt to subvert them; it is merely a way for all contractors and all archaeologists who use BAJR to know what is expected and what the bottom line is.

It is true to say that some people feel that the BAJR pay minima represent de facto levels, but this is not the intent. Although, every company is consulted annually on the following 12 monthly grade pay scale, the choice to advertise or not, is always in the hands of the contractor. They are free to pay less than the quoted grade if they wish, but if they do they know that their jobs will not be advertised on BAJR.

Thus the modern day BAJR is a beast of three parts:

  1. Jobs portal – It is accepted by archaeologists working in the United Kingdom that BAJR (British Archaeological Jobs and Resources) is a trusted portal for archaeology job adverts and has a strong pay and conditions ethic.
  2. Forum – BAJR also provides a platform to encourage open debate on all that is right, wrong and humorous about the archaeological profession.
  3. Information provider – A comprehensive searchable directories ranging from curatorial services to heritage courses within the UK.

It is now fifteen years since the first BAJR website was uploaded but the brand and the ethos behind it has stood the test of time.

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The modern interactive face of the BAJR site today with each component playing a special part within British archaeology.

The Future?

Defining and distracting views of BAJR include misconceptions, expectations and beliefs that merged into a monolithic vision of an organisation that must be up to something, but what was that something?

Find out now as Part II and Part III of the Rise of BAJR can be found here and here